Poems In Green Ink

Just Slow Clap It Out

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Fic: Found the Devil In Me (4/?)

poemsingreenink:

Title: Found the Devil In Me (4/?)

Author: Poemsingreenink

Summary: Santana is a pirate who’s just struck a deal with Cassandra July, goddess of chaos, strife and dance. If she can keep her end of the bargain Cassandra will bring her lover Dani back to life.  This is that adventure….and all the little adventures in-between.

Warnings: Violence because there’s a FIGHT SCENE! PREPARE FOR THE FIGHT SCENE!

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Filed under Santana Lopez pirate santana glee poems writes fic found the devil in me femslash Shannon Beiste Tina Cohen-Chang Kurt Hummel fanfiction brittana dantana

19,545 notes

lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.
One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.
However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.
All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:







Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:


I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this particular video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

lierdumoa:

benwinstagram:

tru

So I watched this music video, and this is in fact completely untrue. There are many scenes in which black/brown girls are casted.

One could conceivably argue that  any white star who features twerking in a music video is automatically being exploitative.

However, that was not my perception of this video in particular. It actually appeared to me the director took pains to portray a variety of dance styles (ballet, interpretive dance, rhythmic gymnastics, break dancing, twerking, cheerleading, etc.) all as equally valid art forms. Every performing group in the video includes a variety of ethnicities. I think I did actually see a black/brown dancer in the ballet troupe, though it’s difficult to tell. Look in the rear left of this gif:

We don’t know if they cast individual dancers or hired a dance troupe, so if black women are underrepresented that might say more about the dance troupe’s selection practices than the video director’s casting practices.

All the styles of dance, ballet or otherwise are presented in the same fashion — talented professionals being brilliant + Taylor Swift being endearingly incompetent. The black women in the video aren’t portrayed as Taylor’s dancing accessories, but rather as experts in their style:

Moreover, at the end of the video there’s a sequence showing all the different professionals being silly and dancing in a non-choreographed manner, thereby humanizing them, showing they exist outside of their role as dancers in Taylor’s video:

I think if we interpret the twerking scenes in this video as demeaning, that says more about our cultural perception of black women than it does about this particular video’s specific portrayal of black women. 

(via vampireisabitstrong)

Filed under taylor swift

829 notes

At first I was kind of shell-shocked when I transitioned from theater to TV. In theater, you have weeks, sometimes months of rehearsal, but with ‘Glee’ it was a whirlwind. And I had never been on a set before. Darren Criss actually got me a TV set 101 book that broke down what everybody’s job was because I literally had no idea what was going on.
Grant Gustin for NYLON Magazine (via grantgustinnews)

(via nadiacreek)

Filed under grant gustin darren criss glee